Phoenix Groupyltf
T: 01438 722142
M: 07748 690989
E: info@phoenixgroup.org.uk

What People Say About Us

 

 

Why is Phoenix SO fab?

 

Beatrice (aged 10) is profoundly deaf. Beatrice doesn't sign, she speaks (beautifully). She wears one implant and one hearing aid. Her family are all hearing. Bea attends mainstream school where she is the only deaf child:

 

“Phoenix is a great place, truly epic. It has helped me to boost my confidence. I would love to go there every week and learn to sign.

“I felt so confident when I met Becky (trainer) who has the same kind of hearing loss as mine (genetic).

“It made me feel just like any other deaf child when I heard that they all watch the television with subtitles on. I am not unique, just the same as other deaf children.

“When I see a room full of people wearing hearing aids and implants I just feel normal. I don't feel different.”

 

Kate (mum of Beatrice):

“So far Beatrice and her hearing sister Hatty (12) have visited Phoenix twice now and the difference in Beatrice's confidence and self esteem is quite staggering. Since Beatrice's first visit to Phoenix she has literally walked taller, I can see a noticeable difference in her attitude. Rather than being quite sedentary and retreating to her room to play on her tablet, Bea has been much more energetic. She has been initiating games of football with her brother. Taking the dog out for a walk without being asked and generally being much more engaged with all the family.

 

“Beatrice copes so very well with her hearing loss that I think sometimes we all almost forget that she is deaf. It is so, so important for her, at this stage of her life, to engage with other deaf children in order for her to make sense of her own identity.

 

“I am so excited about all the forthcoming Phoenix events for children, particularly the independence groups which will help Beatrice move confidently from childhood to becoming a more independent and self reliant teenager. What I like most about Phoenix is their foresight in preparing deaf youngsters to cope with and interact with the outside world in a way which will empower these individuals throughout the rest of their lives.”


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